Only Love Will Drive Out The Hate

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness, only light can do that.  Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that.”                       Martin Luther King

America seems be be feeding on a daily diet of troubling times.  Chaos on our southern border, increased poverty, expansion of terrorism through the rise of the Islamic extremist movement called Issis and now the shooting of a black teenager in Ferguson Missouri.  The undercurrent of black hate directed toward whites.  It appears that black citizens in this small Missouri town have bought into the doctrine of hate and unbridled bigotry peddled by Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, rather than adhere to the philosophy of the man who did more to give the downtrodden a dream.  That man:  Martin Luther King Jr.

It is unfortunate that racism still exists in America in spite of the progress made by Dr. King, Medgar Evers and other black reformers.  It must be stamped out.  What would Martin Luther King say this day if he were in Ferguson?  Would he not ask for reason and calm to prevail, for emotions to give way to patience?  Failure to allow the legal system in America to fulfill its purpose is to say that we as Americans do not believe in the God given freedoms that this country is to provide to all men and women.

I pray daily for peace in America.  I pray for an increased measure of love for all mankind.  I am saddened when I see the reaction without reason that Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson etc. have instilled in the hearts of the blacks of Ferguson.  So much of what Martin  Luther King fought and died for has been undone by A & J.

Never Quit

Quote

“I realized early on that success was tied to not giving up.  Most people in this business gave up and went on to other things.  If you simple didn’t give up, you would outlast the people who came on the bus with you.”                                                                                                 – Harrison Ford

I am amazed that the seemingly pervasive philosophy spreading throughout this great nation and even the world is one of quitting.  If George Washington had quit would we be paying taxes to the Queen?  If Winston Churchill had quit would the worlds population be blond haired and blue eyed and would we be speaking German or Russian?  If  Christopher Columbus had quit would America be the greatest nation in the world?

Quitting is easy.

It’s easy to roll over and go back to sleep when the alarm goes off.

It’s easy to relinquish control of the day (or night) to the television.

It’s easier to run away from a hard marriage than it is to find ways to make it work.

It’s easier to settle for the meager subsistence the government can provide than it is to make and follow dreams.

It’s easier to let the story you want to write languish in your mind than it is to sit down and make it live.

It’s easier to chug a super size coke and put away a triple decker fat burger than it is to wash down a healthy salad with a cup of water.

It’s easier to say “I really don’t look that bad” than it is to spend forty five minutes on the tread mill.

Harrison Ford could have avoided the disappointment that comes from rejection and walked away from his dream of appearing on the silver screen.  He didn’t.  He didn’t quit. He convinced someone, sometime, that he had it, consequently he became one of the most popular and highly sought after actors.

Quitting is easy but the rewards of persistence are euphoric!!

Victory or Defeat

“Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win great triumphs, even checkered by failure  than to join the ranks of those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.”                                                       – Teddy Roosevelt

My father was a sheep rancher who lived in the day when his home on the range was a “motor home”  propelled by an unusual team.  The quarter horse, Snip, was dependable and trustworthy.  The other half of the team was a big eared mule who was a master at working within self-imposed limits on his personal achievement.  The round-top, canvas covered wagon was father’s home.  A second small, compact wagon (commissary) contained extra supplies including hay and grain for the team, water, etc. and was connected to the back of the wagon with a small chain.  When it was time to move the team pulled them both.

Although indolent, father gave the mule credit for being smart but the animal used his intelligence to cultivate his laziness.

Whenever the camp was moved and the road became steep the mule would cease to pull.  Somehow Blackie knew the load could be lightened if father unhooked the commissary.  The frustrating ritual was for father to unhook the commissary, move the wagon beyond the “obstacle,” come back and get the commissary, hook it to the wagon again and move on.  This pattern persisted until one day father tricked the mule.  When the mule stopped as the train approached a steep incline in the road, father set the brake, wrapped the reins around the handle and stepped down from the wagon.  He walked to the back of the wagon, rattled the chain that connected the commissary and then climbed back into his seat.  He released the brake and slapped the reins on the backs of the animals and up the hill they went.  The mule never knew what hit him.

Father’s message to his family came not through preaching but through his example.  Within the true story of the mule lay a message that inspired me to move beyond the natural instinct to settle for mediocrity.

Happiness comes when, at the end of the day, we can say we reached a little higher, ran a little faster, smiled a little brighter and helped someone else along the way and that we did it by rising above the desire to please self. Perhaps we just need someone to, on occasion, rattle our chain.

 

The journey through Blind Revenge from page 1 to page 452

After seven years of taking this project seriously my story is finally in print.  My fantasy to be a writer came true as I took it seriously, sat down and began to write.  It’s amazing that I have progressed from a thirteen year old boy who sat in the fields for corn and wheat and dreamed of writing to a 71 year old man who is now in print.  Even though I let life get in the way I never gave up on the dream.  How gratifying it is to finally have done it.  The greatest endorsement and the biggest relief as to whether I have written something folks will pay money to read came in the form of a call to one of the first purchasers of Blind Revenge.  She called and wanted to purchase three more copies to give to her friends and family.

I truly feel I’m on my way.  Now, how to get the word out that Blind Revenge in an engaging and compelling story that will keep readers engaged and entertained all the way to page 452.  And it’s not just the story but the setting.  You’ll love the setting